Penis Captivus ‘Magun’ and its Cure/Solution

1
29
Penis Captivus

I have to write about this because many people think it is a myth and somehow spiritually related. Penis captivus popularly referred to as ‘Magun’ (an African charm which is applied to punish adulterers) to check her infidelity in the Yoruba speaking part of Nigeria, is a rare occurrence during sexual intercourse when the muscles in the vagina clamp down on the penis much more firmly than usual, making it difficult for the penis to be withdrawn from the vagina.

Penis captivus is very rare and it is unclear how often it occurs since most couples may be able to disconnect from one another before medical attention is necessary. So there possibly won’t be any report regarding it.

Here are answers to some few questions which i believe must be going through your mind with regards to this rare medical condition.

How does it happen?

Basically, for penis captivus to occur, a series of events during sex must take place. The penis, which fills with blood during an erection, may continue to grow in size before orgasm. The vagina’s walls, which are made of muscular tissue, expand and contract during sex. The muscles inside the vagina may pulse slightly during an orgasm, too.

On occasion, the vaginal muscles may contract more than typical. These contractions can narrow the vaginal opening. This narrowing could prevent a man from removing his penis, especially if he’s still engorged and erect.

Penis captivus should not be confused with vaginismus, though a relation between the supposed event of penis captivus and the occurrence of vaginismus is assumed in the existing descriptions.

What does it feel like?

Typical vaginal contractions may be pleasurable for the man. The increased pressure around the penis may intensify sensations. However, if your penis becomes stuck inside the vagina, the pleasing pressure may not be pleasant enough to overrule the worry about your predicament.

Is there clinical evidence of this?

Because penis captivus is so rare, there’s virtually no research or medical evidence of the event. However, that doesn’t mean reports of the condition haven’t appeared in medical literature.

According to a 1979 article in the British Medical Journal, this condition was unknown in the twentieth century, but a subsequent letter to the same journal reported an apparent case of penis captivus in 1947.

More recently, in 2016, a reputable Kenyan television channel ran a news segment that featured a couple who was carried to a local witch doctor after becoming stuck. See image below.

Penis captivus

What should I do if it happens to me?

During or after intercourse and you discover you and your partner can’t disconnect, it’s important to remain calm. Panicking can lead to forcefully attempting to withdraw the penis, and that can lead to more pain and discomfort.

Most couples will only be stuck for a few seconds, so give yourself a break from the action. Take a few deep breaths, and the muscles will likely relax for you.

In the event that you remain stuck after a few minutes, call for emergency medical attention. A doctor or healthcare provider may be able to inject a muscle relaxer into you or your partner to help ease the contractions.

If this keeps happening, make a point to tell your doctor at your next visit. They may want to look for possible underlying conditions, such as vaginismus or blood flow problems, that could contribute to the unusual situation.

Major Facts to Note:

  • Penis captivus is a very rare condition.
  • Most couples will never experience it, but if you do, remember to remain calm.
  • Don’t panic and don’t try to disconnect yourself apart from your partner. You could hurt the two of you, which will only make the situation work.
  • Most couples will be able to separate after a few seconds, or at worst, a few minutes. While it may be uncomfortable, stop the action and wait it out. You’ll be unhooked soon enough.

 

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here